What Is Biofeedback


WHAT IS BIOFEEDBACK and HOW WE USE IT TO OPTIMIZE YOUR COUNSELING EXPERIENCE AND EFFECTIVENESS AT AVITA Biofeedback involves the use of highly specialized, highly sensitive, non-invasive technology that identifies your body’s physiological stress markers. Stress markers generally indicate inordinate stress, as well as resistance to or inability to recover from that inordinate stress. As long ago as 1994, over 70 medical conditions and diseases had already been definitively linked to chronic stress! Many forms of Biofeedback have been around for a long time—some over a hundred years! Because of this long history, we have a huge body of normative data to provide us with the parameters that provide a healthy range versus a compromised state for these stress markers. A familiar example of one basic but important type of Biofeedback is a thermometer! Another is a blood pressure cuff. While these two measures are common health indicators, they are also Biofeedback tools that flag physiological stress. Our goal is to assess the feedback markers and then help you learn an effective skill set of techniques to mitigate your habitual or uninformed behaviors and cognitive responses to the detrimental stressfulness we experience- to create a “life toolbox,” if you will. We help you learn how to: Recognize Recover from and Master your response to anxiety and stress Manage yourself in the face of events and situations that create stress in your life. EYou will develop the skills to drive ASR [Autonomic Self- Regulation], strengthen your HRV [heart rate variability,] and become independent in using them with high efficacy. EYou will learn the process of creating and sustaining constructive change; rather than being pulled back to the anchors of old and/or detrimental behaviors and responses. The outcome: you will feel and function better in your private, personal/family, professional and social life. Instead of being reactive; you can you use these skills to be proactive in your life. Instead of being the passenger in your own life, you will learn to become the pilot… Cognitive function will improve; your counseling will be more effective because you will be more receptive to and successful with the process of change, and will be enabled to being more attentive during the sessions. Frequently, business or work performance improves as well. © Ellie Wolf JULY 2018


Read more


Resolve to recover: Tips help you to stay the course


Image courtesy of Pixabay Choosing recovery is the best decision you could make. It’s important to set yourself up for success by continuing to make good choices throughout your journey. Here is important advice to help you stay on track through 2018. Make it Count Your recovery is an investment in yourself. You’re investing in your health, your lifestyle and your future. Take the opportunity to reframe your life and renew who you are. According to Psych Central, here is how to make the most of this investment. Your mindset. Many people enter recovery with negative feelings weighing on them. It’s possible you experience feelings of hopelessness or failure. Instead, focus on the fact that you are taking positive steps. What you’re doing is courageous and you should commend yourself for your choice. Be realistic. Remember that you’re in a program for a disease. Addiction doesn’t go away, and you won’t be “cured.” As some experts explain, many people enter rehab during a crisis, and aren’t necessarily thinking of long-term resolution but want a quick fix that makes others happy. However, you are reframing your life and learning new behaviors, thought patterns, and new methods of how to conduct yourself. This is a lifelong commitment that will get easier as time goes on. Embrace structure. Most rehab programs are full of rules, and you may feel restricted or somewhat insulted by the supervision and guidance provided. However it’s for your benefit to let go of some freedoms during the early part of your journey. Be open minded. Remember many people struggle with addiction. In fact, some studies reflect a rapidly growing issue in America. You may be surprised at how much commonground you share with others. You could discover connecting with other addicts is an encouragement in your journey. Staff and therapists can teach you about what you are experiencing. People around you are partners in your challenge, so remember they are working to support and assist you. Similarly, share your own story as you go. There can be healing in acknowledging your path. Persevere. The journey of recovery is not an easy one. There may be times you want to give up, you may receive advice you don’t like or you may find there are aspects of who you are that make you feel bad. Recognize that every time you push through these events, you will enter a new phase of healing. Your New Life It’s important to realize you will be rebuilding your life. You will need to evaluate all of your relationships and lifestyle in order to make healthy choices that promote your well-being. If someone is detrimental to your healing, it’s important to step away from the relationship. Similarly, you need to find an appropriate place to live following rehab, one that will support your good choices. You’ll want to find a place that helps you create a healthy, consistent routine without throwing you into the paths of old triggers. You’ll also want a loving environment to rebuild your relationships and bond with your family, a place where you can heal and focus on your recovery. Set yourself up for success by making the most of your investment. Maintain a great outlook and rebuild your life in a healthy way.


Read more


We Welcome To Our Team a New Psychotherapist!


We are delighted to announce the addition of a new therapist to the Avita Integrative Care team, Shelly Cherkassky! Shelly is a licensed psychotherapist and completed her graduate education at New York University. Shelly specializes in providing evidence-based therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents and adults who experience distorted thoughts, low self-esteem, anxiety, difficulty managing stress/anger, relationship conflicts and post-traumatic stress disorder. With compassion and acceptance, she can help guide you through the therapeutic process towards change, healing and growth. She is devoted to working collaboratively with her patients to support development, help to enhance relationships with others and to help overcome feelings of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, ambivalence or difficulties in relationships, work, or marital conflict. If you are interested in scheduling an appointment to work with Shelly, please call (888) 242-2732 x5 or e-mail [email protected]


Read more


Six Research Backed Ways to Beat the Winter Blues and Protect Your Mental Health


By Sara Pasternak, LMSW, LSW It’s that time of year again! After the holiday season ends, many of us find ourselves in a post-holiday winter slump. The months of January and February sometimes seem to drag by endlessly and some people even fall victim to symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder (also known as “Seasonal Depression”). In fact, researcher Darren Cotterell (2010) found that approximately 5 percent of the U.S. population is diagnosed with Seasonal Affective Disorder! Here at Avita Integrative Care, we would like to empower our readers and patients with some tips that can help them battle the blues. Here are seven simple tricks that can help you protect your mental health this winter: 1. Get Moving! Getting plenty of exercise can help safeguard against Seasonal Affective Disorder during the winter months (and year-round)! In fact, research has shown that exercise can treat mild to moderate depression just as effectively as antidepressant medications (Robinson & Segal, 2017). It is recommended to aim for about 30-60 minutes of physical activity daily in order to notice significant benefits. However, even a little exercise is better than no exercise at all. Additionally, if you can get yourself moving outside in natural sunlight, you may notice a stronger positive effect than if you chose to do your exercise indoors. 2. Find a Buddy Who Loves Winter! According to research, emotions can be contagious. When people chose to surround themselves with happy individuals, they tend to feel more content and less stressed out themselves (Carter, 2012). Therefore, scheduling social plans with a positive, winter-loving friend can help influence your own mood, outlook and feelings about the colder weather and winter months. 3. Brighten Up Your Home. Open your windows and turn on your lights! Perhaps, even invest in a special light box that can be used to treat Seasonal Depression, such as this one here: https://www.amazon.com/Sphere-Gadget-Technologies-Lightphoria-Energy/dp/B004JF3G08/ref=zg_bs_13053141_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=Z8AGJGMFMPSBBBWQVB1G. Research shows that sitting next to a light box such as this one for 30 minutes a day can be just as effective in treating Seasonal Affective Disorder as Anti-Depressant medications (Hauck, n.d.). 4. Book a Vacation! If possible, treat yourself to a short vacation or weekend getaway. Choose a warm destination such as southern Florida or the Caribbean to get a healthy dose of “summer” weather. According to Dr. Rohan “Across the board, [Seasonal Affective Disorder] patients will tell [mental health practitioners that] they feel better [after taking vacations]” (Orlov, 2014). 5. Take Vitamin D Supplements. According to researchers Penckofer, Kouba, Byrn, and Ferrans (2010) , Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is prevalent when vitamin D stores are typically low. Try taking a vitamin D supplement daily to counteract any deficiencies that may be messing with your mood. Supplements can be purchased at a pharmacy or your local Whole Foods Market. Of course, always talk to your primary care physician before starting any new dietary supplements. 6. Book an Appointment with a Mental Health Professional Beginning a therapeutic relationship with a licensed mental health professional can help one work through unpleasant symptoms and feelings experienced during the winter months. Certain types of psychotherapy, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) have been shown to be effective in treating depressive symptoms (Melrose, n.d.). Here at Avita Integrative Care we offer CBT, biofeedback, and psychological services/psychotherapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder and other mental health conditions. If you would like to schedule an appointment or discuss your concerns with a clinician please call (888) 242-2732. To speak with the Sara Pasternak, LMSW, LSW, the author of this blog post, dial extension 4. Resources: Carter, S. B. (2012, Oct). Emotions Are Contagious-- Choose Your Company Wisely. Retrieved 2018, from Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/high-octane-women/201210/emotions-are-contagious-choose-your-company-wisely Darren Cotterell. “Pathogenesis and management of seasonal affective disorder.” Progress in Neurology and Psychiatry, Volume 14, Issue 5, Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2010 Hauck, B. (n.d.). 8 Scientifically-Backed Ways to Beat the Winter Blues. Retrieved Jan 2018, from RealSimple.com: https://www.realsimple.com/health/mind-mood/emotional-health/winter-blues Melrose, S. (n.d.), Treating seasonal affective disorder with cognitive behavioural therapy is comparable to light therapy. Evidence-Based Mental Health 2016;19:e21. Penckofer, S., Kouba, J., Byrn, M., & Ferrans, C. E. (2010). Vitamin D and Depression: Where is all the Sunshine? Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31(6), 385–393. http://doi.org/10.3109/01612840903437657 Robinson, L. &. (2017, October). Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): Recognizing and Treating the Winter Blues. Retrieved January 2018, from Helpguide.org: https://www.helpguide.org/articles/depression/seasonal-affective-disorder-sad.htm


Read more


Powerful Secrets: Stretching Yourself to Embrace Change


It's that time again, when many people have begun the process of making those resolutions happen. While some embrace, even bask in, the promise of change, others falter in the slow torture—often doomed to failure—that change represents to them. We have great plans and aspirations, yet so often find ourselves at the end of each year having made little or no progress— or worse, having lost ground. Many have long since abandoned the annual ritual, because they grew weary of falling off the log, which makes them feel even worse. Why is it so hard to change? Thousands of wise and seasoned answers are offered in books, articles, interviews and research. We know what the formulas are and that change requires thoughtful planning and devoted execution. Change must be conceivable, believable, achievable, etc. Most of us are capable of excellent planning and have the means at our disposal to support the changes we aspire to make. More than the "how" of change; it’s the endurance of change that often eludes us. Why is it easier to fail at change than succeed? My work in Biofeedback and Stress Recovery brings people from all stations and walks of life and careers. From high profile professional, Olympic, collegiate and scholastic athletes to performers and musicians, to business and corporate leaders and healthcare professionals, dedicated parents, teachers, coaches, students, police and firefighters, employees, craftspeople and professionals of all kinds: everybody—young, middle and older, without exception—struggles with change. Quite simply: change feels stressful! "Stress Management" is not enough! Instead we need to learn how to manage ourselves in the face of the stress we experience, and build resilience. The archaic concept of ‘stress management’ is a myth! Life is full of stress, and it’s not going away any time soon. We truly cannot ‘manage’ a great deal of what stresses us. But what we can do- —what we must do—is learn to manage ourselves in the face of the stress we experience. A similar approach is the concept of “time management.” The truth is that no one can manage time. The clock keeps ticking and time moves forward. What we can do however, is learn to manage ourselves within the time that we have. There is a very fundamental difference in perspective here. We can now move from the passenger seat to the pilot seat. All stress is not bad stress. In order to change, we are asking ourselves to do something (or several things) differently. Doing things differently feels strange, uncomfortable to us. Many of us don’t tolerate this discomfort easily or well, and therefore the concept—as well as the work—of change is experienced as stressful to many people. The habitual response to stress is to do something that relieves or removes the stress. When we respond that way, the stress is making the decisions. To relieve the stressfulness, we then revert back to the “old way” and it “feels” better. Further, we often have a mindset that stress is bad and everything that stresses us requires relief. And that’s where we get stuck. This mindset anchors us to the old behaviors, and sabotages our efforts to change. We simply don’t or can’t tolerate the stressful discomfort of change long enough for it to become the new comfort! How do we learn to tolerate the discomfort that the process of change creates, long enough to get comfortable and succeed in making a change? This process is initially counter-intuitive since we are programmed by habits and life experience to resist discomfort. So we need to adopt a new and different skill set to manage it. A current perspective on this process is referred to as "stretching yourself." Learning the skills of stress recovery and resilience enable a person to restore their sense of emotional and cognitive balance and function. The feeling will be tangibly different than the sense of stress which disrupts our intentions. During the challenging early phases of change, you can employ these skills to soften the stressfulness that accompanies the discomfort of change. As you master the skills of reducing the stressfulness you feel, you will resist change less and can learn to tolerate it with the understanding, determination and self-trust that the change you have selected is good for you and your future. Many skills and techniques can restore balance and counteract stress. One of the most powerful and effective is to learn the skill of intentional, rhythmic diaphragmatic breathing. Another is to train yourself to remain mindful and focused on what you are doing, rather than what you want. In this kind of work, when we focus too much on what we want, our stress level stays too high to get it (the classic “trying too hard,” as in test taking anxiety). However, when we master the skill of remaining mindful, together with balanced breathing, and focus on what we are doing; then, what we want will usually show up. It isn’t forced; it “happens.” Once this stress recovery is engaged, the stress is no longer making your decisions; YOU are making your decisions. In this way you learn to tolerate and resist that stressful “pull” back to the old habit, allowing the new ideas and behaviors to gradually replace the old ones. The experience generates a new comfort paired with the new habit: the change you want. Not saying it’s easy, but when you understand the mechanics of the resistance to change, and begin to regularly practice the skills and tools to manage your response to it; you can also pave the way to change and the greater things you want for yourself in the weeks, months and years ahead! You can learn to more comfortably "stretch!" Practice these skills for 10 minutes every day. EVERY DAY. Yes, you do have 10 minutes a day for personal development and growth. Invest in yourself! Practice and allow time to adjust; be a little patient. Practice makes permanence. This year I resolved to share these ideas with the LinkedIn community. Hopefully the concepts will resonate for you and help to unlock the understanding, tools and courage to take those initial small steps in learning to tolerate the discomfort of change—just long enough to become comfortable with the new “who and what” you’d like to become! Happy 2018! And best wishes for a successful year, in a safe and peaceful world Cheers! Share your journey if you feel the ideas were effective for you! ©Ellie M.B. Wolf, MS, BCB; Fellow, BCIA (Biofeedback Certification International Alliance)


Read more


Welcome To Our Newest Psychotherapist!


We are Excited to Welcome Sara Pasternak to the Avita Integrative Care Team! Sara is a licensed psychotherapist and completed her graduate education at Columbia University. She has extensive experience helping children, adolescents, and young adults overcome anxiety, depression and other mental health conditions. In her work with patients, she uses evidence-based therapeutic approaches in order to help clients feel better as soon as possible. Sara has worked in a variety of school and higher education settings and specializes in providing treatment to youth struggling with anxiety, self-esteem issues, and academic struggles. Her treatment approach is collaborative, warm, non-judgemental, extremely supportive, and informed by the latest research. She has completed post-graduate coursework in modalities such as Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), Trauma-Focused CBT (TF-CBT) and Dialectal Behavior Therapy (DBT), and remains committed to her life-long professional development. Sara is a passionate and empathetic therapist that is extremely devoted to helping those she works with find happiness and make lasting and meaningful changes in their lives! If you are interested in scheduling an appointment to work with Sara, please call (888) 242-2732 x4 or e-mail [email protected]


Read more


APPETITE OR HUNGER


There is a difference in the desire or influence to eat at almost any given time. Nutritionists, dieticians, and psychologists refer to this situation as appetite versus hunger. The need and physical readiness to provide fuel and nutrition for the body is hunger. The desire or longing to eat -often influenced by emotions, occasions, sensations, and situations - is appetite. The idea here is that one could identify the difference between appetite and hunger by categorizing one's "sense" of the motivating factors that bring eating to mind. So, if a person is aware of what drives their motivation to eat at the moment - even though the awareness doesn't "solve" an underlying emotional issue; that awareness can and does provide a platform for making a decision about whether and what to eat at that moment. This process is different than simply “succumbing,” or resisting the urge to eat. Eating is healthier when you've made a conscious decision about it, instead of an automatic or mindless response. The authors of the book Think Thin, Be Thin summed up the situation pretty neatly in the following way. Here is their summary, with some minor edits. Also many other experts take issue with the idea that appetite is driven exclusively by emotional factors. PHYSICAL HUNGER Builds gradually Occurs several hours after a meal Goes away when full or “satisfied” Felt or noticed "below the neck" -- ie: stomach Eating leads to a feeling or sense of satisfaction/satiation "EMOTIONAL HUNGER”= APPETITE Develops suddenly Unrelated to time, or amount of time since last meal Present/persists despite feeling full Felt or noticed "above the neck" – ie: a "taste" for cookies, chips, etc., or being “in the mood” for a snack Eating in this state of mind often leads to guilt, shame, or disappointment—as well as overeating Take some time this week to study and understand these two categories of hunger. Maybe you will gain some insight in identifying some of your thoughts and patterns that are playing a role in your decisions about eating. [MINDSET] Sometimes we quietly berate ourselves with the old and sort of tyrannical ideas about "emotional eating". Not all emotional eating is driven by negative emotions or thoughts! And the so-called "comfort foods" that sometimes tempt us when we are not physically in need of food; are not always a regression into some deep, dark cavern of pain and sorrow from our past lives. Yes- sometimes chocolate is just one of "our happy thoughts," as Peter Pan put it so brightly. A small piece of chocolate will probably not knock you off the log, as long as you remain mindful and don't allow it to become a symbol of defeat, or to control your next decision. Some eating is stress driven, and that is where Biofeedback can make an amazing difference. My "PAUSE" plan comes in very handy in this scenario. HINT: If you do find yourself being judgmental, berating yourself, etc. – say this nice little reminder to stop yourself: "CANCEL, CANCEL;" and then proceed in moving yourself back into a positive mindset. Good resource: the book Mindless Eating by Brian Wansink, Cornell University consumer behavior professor. PRACTICE MAKES PERMANENCE! © Ellie Wolf, MS, BCB, Fellow/BCIA February 2011/Revised August 2017


Read more


Avita Integrative Care: On the Forefront of Comprehensive Mental Health Practice


Avita Integrative Care (“On the forefront of comprehensive mental health practice”) recently announced the opening of its second office, conveniently located in Fort Lee. A quietly warm and comforting environment welcomes you, and Avita offers a great deal more than your typical psychology practice. If you are looking for a wider range of psychological services, Avita has combined some powerful and specialized counseling and allied counseling services under a canopy of care to serve and benefit both individuals and families. The dynamic, compassionate and pro-active team is led by Kalman Khodik, Psy.D., whose vision for comprehensive mental health care seems to know no limits. He integrates what each person expresses with what they truly need, then gently yet firmly creates a flow of information and skills that converge to transform problems into healthy, life-altering solutions and pathways. Khodik spent many years in facilitating positive change and organizational optimization at some of the most prominent global corporations, such as McKinsey & Company, the World Bank and the Credit Suisse Group. Dr. Khodik currently serves as the director of psychological and psychophysiological services at Avita Integrative Care, LLC, a practice dedicated to providing an integrative and comprehensive approach to various disorders related to anxiety, emotional dysregulation and poor stress resilience. With formal training in several theoretical orientations including long-term and brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral techniques, biofeedback and evidence-based drug and alcohol counseling, Dr. Khodik integrates treatment strategies to best fit each patient’s unique needs. He can also integrate spirituality into his professional work through his own spiritual journey and current practice. So he is uniquely positioned to help patients explore openly their relationships with the sacred and overcome their spiritual struggles, and guide them to reaching an integrated sense of self. Khodik speaks fluent Russian and has international, multicultural exposure; so he is also skilled in providing a culturally sensitive approach. This allows patients to freely express themselves and explore their conflicts, while creating real and sustainable change. His keen abilities to identify and address the operative factors in a person’s internal battleground provide the gentle yet firm guidance towards understanding and resolving the issues that have become an obstacle to living their optimum life. A ZocDoc rating states: “My appointment with Dr. Khodik went great. Dr. Khodik made me feel comfortable and safe. At the end of our session, which was very pleasant, he outlined the course of treatment we should take. I have been to other therapists, but I would rate Dr. Khodik as the top one for making me feel safe and comfortable to share my thoughts and feelings. I genuinely felt better after the session. I can’t wait to come back.” Khodik’s vision of care advances the important perspective of a diversified approach to certain types of issues. To this purpose, he has assembled a team of specialists that will promote each client’s personal needs to the best and highest good. Since so many people are challenged by multiple issues—some psychological, some situational, some spiritual, and others medical or health-related—we know that multiple issues can affect each other, adding to the severity of any of them. To accommodate this frequent scenario, Avita Integrative Care has engaged the compassionate and highly effective expertise of Ellie Wolf, MS, BCB, Fellow BCIA, a seasoned biofeedback practitioner. Ellie’s reputation is well established in some of the most highly respected health care institutions in the country. Formerly senior biofeedback provider at the Pain Management Center of RIC (the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, rated as the top rehab hospital in the country for almost 30 years in a row), and later at the Raby Institute for Integrative Medicine of Northwestern University Medical Center in Chicago, she brings a portfolio of success and skills in biofeedback treatment to the Avita family of practitioners. She has also worked with NFL and MLB professionals; Olympic, collegiate and elite athletes; and professional dancers and musicians. Endorsed strongly by her former colleagues and patients, here is what people are saying: “I have had the tremendous opportunity to learn from Ellie how to employ the powerful impact of biofeedback as an adjunct in controlling procedure-related pain. Many of my patients require bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, which can be a very painful experience. Biofeedback provides patients a way to focus their attention towards achieving a state of calm self-management, both physically and mentally. The patient feels more in control, reporting less discomfort. This also renders the procedure much easier for me, as the doctor, to perform.”—Dr. Marlon Kleinman, MD, medical hematologist/oncologist, 2016 “Thank you for all of the positive support and biofeedback for my back pain resulting from multiple myeloma. My average pain dropped from 8 out of 10 to an easily manageable average of 0-3. I no longer need to wear a back brace or walk with a cane, and am finally off of the addictive narcotic pain meds that were running my life for five years! I am indebted to you for empowering me to get back into the ‘pilot seat’ of my life.—Mike F., 2016 “I work in a fast-paced and stressful environment [the NFL]. The biofeedback work with Ellie Wolf helped me to control my reaction to the stress and be more productive. And it has certainly helped me to enjoy the work so much more!”—Bob L. Sept. 2016 Biofeedback involves the use of non-invasive, externally applied physiological monitoring technology that identifies a person’s stress markers. Most biofeedback technology has been around for 50 or more years, so we have a huge body of normative data that tells us whether a person is within or outside the normal ranges. Stress markers can tell us whether a person’s body is expressing inordinate or prolonged levels of stress that have been highly correlated to compromised health and reduced immune system function. High stress is also linked to compromised cognitive ability and poor or limited work and academic performance. Emerging areas of great success using biofeedback involve the spheres of occupational performance, test-taking anxiety, post-concussion recovery, fibromyalgia, addictive behaviors (like eating, drug abuse and smoking), chemical addictions and autoimmune disorders (POTS and the spectrum of dysautonomia—including Lyme disease, and various GI disorders). Biofeedback has shown amazing promise in these areas and new studies appear regularly. Avita offers a discounted mini-session for those who would like to “try before you buy.” Contact Avita to set up your 30-minute mini-session. No prescription or referral required. Come and experience how this amazing science can change your life forever, relieve and resolve many symptoms of headaches, pain and compromised health, and bolster your school, work or athletic performance. Avita Integrative Care has also stepped up as a trailblazer to meet a vastly distinctive and almost universally challenging life event: the break-up of a marriage. Especially when children are involved, divorce can be one of life’s most difficult and disheartening crossings. Avita Integrative Care understands this reality, and has engaged the highly specialized divorce counseling and mediation expertise of Maryana Kanda, LSW, APM (Accredited Professional Mediator). Since divorce is one of the top five stressful events in one’s life; it is also a time when people make some of the most difficult and important decisions (for themselves, and their children, if applicable). Each year thousands of lives are disrupted and destroyed by the negative and sometimes devastating effects of a litigated divorce. To Avita Integrative Care, you are caring individuals who have come for support and guidance at a time when your high stress level and flaring emotions could impact your ability to make the right choices for yourself and your family. Kanda facilitates the divorce process with sensibility and sensitivity—untethered from partiality—to help you see that there really is light at the end of the tunnel. Here is a testimonial from a respected attorney: “I have worked with Maryana on a number of mediations, and as post-mediation counsel for one of the parties. I have found her work to be thoughtful, sensitive and thorough. Maryana takes the time to understand peoples’ needs and wants, and helps them understand the difference. She is family-centered and helps each party leave the mediation with their dignity and self-respect intact.” Kanda cites a time-honored quote from one of America’s foremost attorneys as a banner for her practice: “Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. Point out to them how the nominal winner is often a real loser—in fees, expenses and waste of time.”—Abraham Lincoln, 1850. Here is Kanda’s special offer to Jewish Link readers: Take advantage of our Grand Opening invitation: free 30-minute consultation to learn how Kanda can serve the best interests of your family or a friend you refer. Just mention the Jewish Link. You can reach Dr. Khodik, Ellie Wolf or Maryana Kanda via email at [email protected] or by calling 888-242-2732. http://jewishlinknj.com/monthly-sections/health-link-new/19601-avita-integrative-care-on-the-forefront-of-comprehensive-mental-health-practice


Read more


Opening in Fort Lee New Jersey


At Avita Integrative Care, we’re working as fast as we can to bring our innovative boutique mental health and wellness practice to North Jersey. We’re a well known New York City Midtown practice, and our patients can visit our NY location when they need to see a specialist. Expanding further in our NYC metro area means it’s even easier for patients to make time for their health – and many will have the convenience and choice of seeing a specialist near their home or work. A major amenity of our Fort Lee office is its proximity to George Washington Bridge and many Bergen county towns, making it easy to visit the doctor as a stop on your commute – a great benefit for our growing roster of enterprise customers. Avita Integrative Care, Fort Lee – New Jersey Area – opens November 17, 2016.


Read more


1 
Resources